Technische Universität Berlin
Photo: mawa design
Photo: mawa design

Technische Universität Berlin

Ring-shaped chandelier in the centre of the vaulted glass ceiling

From 2001-2004, the office of Pitz & Hoh reconstructed the glass canopy above the atrium at the Technical University. A delicate skin of satin-finished glazing in the existing steel structure replaced the strongly decorative original glass interior skin.

The renowned lighting design office of Studio Dinnebier was commissioned to develop a lighting concept and a modern frieze for the room

Lighting design
Büro Pitz & Hoh
Studio Dinnebier
mawa design
Photo: mawa design

The new frieze was formally related to the original, transforming it into a delicate, light-emitting element (composed of lasered and undulating stainless steel). 

During the day, it reflects the daylight from the golden backside onto the silver front creating a warm, filtered effect in the room. At night, the frieze is illuminated from the opposite side and serves as a reflector. 

Photo: mawa design

The ring shaped illumination consists of 64 cylindrical lights, creating an interior conclusion to the curved glass ceiling. The lights consist of 32 groups of switchable lamps with HIT 150W and 32 dimmable 100 W halogen lamps for use during events.

Photo: mawa design

The light valance hangs at a height of 27 m, whereby the total luminous flux of the lights measures at 1500 Lux on the floor. The valance has a diameter of 4 m and weighs approx. 1/2 ton. Track mounted lights are used on the upper section for indirect lighting, outfitted with linear fluorescent luminaries and covered with a dispersion lens.

A strong spotlight with a specially designed Gobo, attached to the glass ceiling, specifically illuminates the contours of the Nike of Samothrace.

Photo: mawa design

A special light was developed for the lower arcade using 2x 70W HIT and special optical lenses for direct lighting the floor.

Photo: mawa design

The valance additionally conceals a loudspeaker and a track mount for exhibit and emergency lighting.

Photo: mawa design